Harry Potter & Deathly Hallows

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Date Added: 11 / 21 / 2012
Category: English Literature
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Harry Potter & Deathly Hallows

View Full Essay Tessa Milks
Professor Hoey
ENGL 2008A
October 24th, 2012
Love and Loyalty in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
In the Harry Potter series JK Rowling uses examples of a variety of relationships - friends, family, lovers, and enemies that are forced into tough decisions in the name of love and duty. Throughout the series we are introduced to an array of characters reacting to the overwhelming feelings that come along with love. Although the relationships are all very different a clear theme of loyalty emerges within all of them. This theme is none so evident as in the final novel of the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. In Deathly Hallows we learn of Severus Snape’s vow to protect the only son of his long lost love, despite his feelings of loathing towards the boy’s father and the risk to his own life. Ron Weasley struggles with friendship and love and allows his jealousy to get the better of him, while Remus Lupin chooses to take a chance in love. Forced to choose between her duty to the Dark Lord and her family, Narcissa Malfoy chooses her son and the unfailing loyalty of a House Elf shows us what it mean to be a friend. In Percy Weasley we see a lost son admit his mistake and return to the family that loves him. The novel’s heroic trio, Harry, Ron and Hermione Granger become more friends than family as they search for the items needed to destroy Voldemort. Harry is surrounded by loyal friends, both living and dead, willing to stand by his side no matter what. Rowling’s use of positive and negative relationships as well as symbolic language and images allows her to instill love’s most important and greatest duties, trust and loyalty.
From the beginning of the series Harry is subjected to ongoing abuse from his guardians and cousin, particularly from his Uncle Vernon.  This tension filled relationship is not one that gets better over time and instead seems to grow more bitter. Harry represents everything the Dursleys find distasteful and this...