Ge E-Business Caselets

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Date Added: 04 / 09 / 2012
Category: Philosophy and Psychology
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Ge E-Business Caselets

View Full Essay GE e-Business Caselets

After virtually ignoring the Internet for several years, the giant awakened in early 1999. At a meeting of the company’s top 500 managers, CEO Jack Welch mandated that each division form independent teams to “Destroy Your Business:” identify an existing online competitor or dream up a hypothetical one that could steal market share from GE, and then devise countermeasures. What did they find? “It turned out there wasn’t much other than Web sites. The business models weren’t good, and the fact is people still need to go to an aircraft engine manufacturer to buy an aircraft engine. But the tools some of these companies were using were tremendous, and we believed they could have a big impact on our productivity.”[1] The “Destroy Your Business” efforts swiftly turned into “Grow Your Business,” and e-Business became the fourth and final company-wide initiative of Welch’s tenure as CEO.

The following caselets describe how four different GE businesses are adopting e-Business tools and principles. As you read them, think about how the activities fit into the “Sell-side, Buy-side, Inside” framework we have been using in class—a framework that is precisely how GE is approaching e-Business.


GE Plastics


This $7.8B division manufactures and sells high-performance engineered plastics to a global customer base primarily consisting of other manufacturers. The plastics business is highly commoditized and tightly competitive, dominated by a few huge global players.

GE Plastics was one of the first GE businesses to sell its products online, starting in mid-1997 through its captive distribution company Polymerland (no, the name is not a joke—check out www.polymerland.com). “We saw the Net as a big curiosity,” says Polymerland’s president Peter Foss. “None of us really know what was going to happen.”[2] In 1999 Polymerland.com began to face challenges from aggregators like PlasticsNet, and weighed joining one of several such B2B exchanges to...