Article of Confederation vs. Constitution

Article of Confederation vs. Constitution

View Full Essay This essay is based on the comparison and contrast of the Article of Confederation and the United States Constitution. Both the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution ran our country, in the past and in the presents. I’ll explain the similarities and different factors in these two documents.
The Articles of Confederation was ratified in 1781, creating a loose confederation a weak government, leaving most of the power within the state governments. They were joined together by a weak congress with many restrictions. With most of the power in the state’s, Congress could only request states to collect taxes. The citizens were asked to voluntarily offer taxes in order to meet a quota that was rarely ever met. Because there was no executive to be in charge of the nation, a strong government was nearly impossible. That meant there was no judicial system, so problems that existed had no way of getting solved. This document paved the way for the Constitution of the United States.
Ratified in 1787, the United State Constitution was finally adopted as the new document in place of the Articles of Confederation. Taking away power from the states and giving it to a central government, the Constitution created an executive, judicial, and a legislative branch. The checks and balances system also assured equality so that no one branch would have more power over the other. Although the government was headed by a president and other official leaders, the people still had the power to run the country through representatives.
These two documents, although governing over the same nation, did so in two different ways. One thing is that they both did was unified the 13 colonies that wanted to be out of the grasp of Britain. The differences are the national governments of each. In the Articles of Confederation, it has a loose congress that was run by individual states rights saying that states had only one vote in congress, there were no congressional powers over taxes, and...